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English definition of “after”

after

preposition  /ˈæf·tər/ us  

after preposition (FOLLOWING)

following in time, place, or order: What do you want to do after breakfast? I expect to return to work after the baby comes. Repeat these words after me. I’ll see you the day after tomorrow. It’s ten minutes after four. Week after week (= For many weeks), he’s been too busy to help.

after preposition (BECAUSE)

as a result of; because: After what she did to me, I’ll never trust her again. She’s named after her aunt (= given the same name in her honor).

after preposition (DESPITE)

despite: Even after everything that’s happened here, his behavior seems odd.

after preposition (WANTING)

wanting to find or have: The police are after him. He’s after Jane’s job.
after
conjunction  /ˈæf·tər/ us  
The house was empty for three months after they moved out.
after
adverb [not gradable]  /ˈæf·tər/ us  
Hilary drove up and Nick arrived soon after.
Idioms
(Definition of after from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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