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English definition of “against”

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against

preposition  /əˈɡenst, əˈɡeɪnst/ us  

against preposition (IN OPPOSITION)

in opposition to; opposed to: I know you’d like to get a more expensive car, but I’m against it. It’s against the law to throw your trash there (= It’s illegal). She voted against the tax increase. He warned them against repeating (= not to repeat) the mistakes of the former administration. Against also means in competition with: He would have to run against O’Toole for county treasurer. To go against something means to go in the opposite direction to it: swimming against the current

against preposition (DIRECTED AT)

directed at or toward: Among the charges leveled against them were bribery and tax evasion. There's a process for filing claims against the city. Note: Used about something negative.

against preposition (TOUCHING)

next to and touching or being supported by something: It would save space if we put the bed against the wall. He leaned his head against the back of his chair.
Translations of “against”
in Korean -에 맞서, - 가까이…
in Arabic ضِدّ, يُلامِس…
in French contre, sur…
in Turkish karşı olma, karşı yarışma, dayanan…
in Italian contro…
in Chinese (Traditional) 反對, 與…相反…
in Russian против, у, к…
in Polish przeciwny, przeciw, z…
in Spanish contra, sobre, respecto a…
in Portuguese contra…
in German gegen, an…
in Catalan contra…
in Japanese ~と対戦して, ~に対抗して, ~にたてかけて…
in Chinese (Simplified) 反对, 与…相反…
(Definition of against from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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