air - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “air”

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air

noun  us   /eər/

air noun (GAS)

[U] the mixture of gases that surrounds the earth and that we breathe: Let’s go outside for some fresh air. [U] Air pressure is the force that air produces when it presses against any surface.

air noun (SPACE ABOVE)

[U] the space above, esp. high above, the ground: Keith kicked the football high in the air.

air noun (FLIGHT)

[U] flight above the ground, esp. in an aircraft: air travel You can get there by train, but it’s faster by air.

air noun (MANNER)

[C] a manner or appearance: She had an air of confidence.

air noun (BROADCAST)

on the air a program or a person on the air is broadcasting on radio or television: His show is on the air from 8:00 to 8:30 every Tuesday night.off the air A program or person that is not broadcasting on radio or television is off the air.

air

verb  us   /er, ær/

air verb (BROADCAST)

[I/T] to broadcast something on radio or television: [T] The game will be aired at 9 p.m. tomorrow.

air verb (MAKE KNOWN)

[T] to make your opinions or complaints known to other people: The meeting gave us a chance to air our complaints.

air verb (CLEAN)

[I/T] to let air from outside come in a room or other inside space to make it smell cleaner, or to put something outside in the air to make it smell cleaner: [M] Let’s open some windows and air out this place.
airing
noun [C]  us   /ˈer·ɪŋ, ˈær-/
The third airing of the miniseries will begin next week.
(Definition of air from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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