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English definition of “bad”

bad

adjective  /bæd/ (comparative worse  /wɜrs/, superlative worst  /wɜrst/) us  

bad adjective (UNPLEASANT)

not good; disappointing or unpleasant, or causing difficulties or harm: We heard the bad news about Dorothy’s illness. Flights were delayed because of bad weather. Too much salt is bad for you (= has a harmful effect on your health). Bad can also mean serious or severe: a bad accident/storm

bad adjective (LOW QUALITY)

of very low quality; not acceptable: bad manners We thought the hotel was bad and the food was terrible. That was one of the worst movies I’ve ever seen.

bad adjective (EVIL)

(of people or actions) evil or morally unacceptable: He’s not a bad person.

bad adjective (UNHEALTHY)

(of a person) ill or not well, or (of an illness) serious or severe: a bad back/heart a bad cough bad health He’s in really bad shape. He’s got bad arthritis and can hardly walk.
(Definition of bad from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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