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English definition of “balance”

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balance

noun  /ˈbæl·əns/ us  

balance noun (POSITION)

[U] the condition of someone or something in which its weight is equally divided so that it can stay in one position or be under control while moving: He jumped off the porch and lost his balance when he landed on the grass, falling to the ground. We’re teaching Sue how to ride a bike, but she’s still having trouble keeping her balance. The horse jumped the fence but landed off balance and fell. art [U] Balance in a work of art means that all the parts of it work together and no part is emphasized too much.

balance noun (OPPOSING FORCES)

[U] a situation in which two opposing forces have or are given the same power: He works toward a balance between extremes. As a journalist, you try to strike a balance between serious reporting and the temptation to say clever things.

balance noun (AMOUNT)

[C usually sing] the amount of money you have in a bank account or an amount of money owed: a bank balance [C usually sing] A balance is also the amount of something that you have left after you have spent or used up the rest: We’ll go over your homework for the first half hour and use the balance of the class period to prepare for the exam.

balance

verb  /ˈbæl·əns/ us  

balance verb (STAY IN POSITION)

[I/T] to make something stay in one position by having its weight equally divided: [T] He balanced the book on top of his coffee cup.

balance verb (MAKE THINGS EQUAL)

[T] to put opposing forces into a position in which neither controls the other: I had to balance the children’s needs against my own.
(Definition of balance from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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