bar Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "bar" - American English Dictionary

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barnoun

 us   /bɑr/

bar noun (POLE)

[C] a strong pole, esp. one made of metal, used as a support, to force something to move, or to block an opening: He stuck his hand through the bars of the cage [C] A bar is also any of various small objects having a rectangular shape: a granola bar

bar noun (DRINKING PLACE)

[C] a place, sometimes within a restaurant, where alcoholic drinks are served, or a long, high table in such a place along which people stand or sit while drinking: He used to just sit in a bar and listen to jazz. They sat at the bar and chatted with the bartender.

bar noun (MUSIC)

[C] (also measure) one of the small equal parts into which a piece of music is divided, containing a fixed number of beats: He played four bars of music. [C] (also measure) A bar is also one of the vertical lines that divide a piece of music into equal parts.

bar noun (LAWYERS)

[U] all lawyers considered as a group: She passed the Massachusetts bar exam on her first try.

barverb [T]

 us   /bɑr/ (-rr-)

bar verb [T] (PREVENT)

to prevent someone from doing something or going somewhere: Protesters tried to break into the building, but the police barred their way.

bar verb [T] (POLE)

to put a strong pole or poles across an opening: We barred the windows as protection against burglars.

barpreposition

 us   /bɑr/

bar preposition (EXCEPT)

except for: He’s the greatest pitcher of all time, bar none (= no one else is better).
(Definition of bar from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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