bear - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “bear”

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bear

noun [C]  us   /beər/

bear noun [C] (ANIMAL)

a large, strong mammal with thick fur that lives esp. in colder parts of the world: a black/grizzly/polar bear

bear

verb  us   /beər/ (past tense bore  /bɔr, boʊr/ , past participle borne  /bɔrn, boʊrn/ )

bear verb (CARRY)

[T] to carry or bring something: Fans bearing banners ringed the stadium.

bear verb (SUPPORT)

[T] to hold or support something: The bridge has to be strengthened to bear heavier loads.

bear verb (ACCEPT)

to accept something painful or unpleasant with determination and strength: [T] Since you will bear most of the responsibility, you should get the rewards. [+ to infinitive] He could not bear to see her suffering.

bear verb (HAVE)

[T] to have as a quality or characteristic: My life bore little resemblance to what I’d hoped for.

bear verb (PRODUCE)

[T] (past participle born  /bɔrn, boʊrn/ ) (of mammals) to give birth to young, or of a tree or plant to give or produce fruit or flowers: She bore three children in five years. Note: When talking about mammals, use the past participle spelling "born" to talk about a person or animal’s birth, and the spelling "borne" to talk about a mother giving birth to a child: She had borne four boys.

bear verb (TRAVEL)

[I always + adv/prep] to travel or move in the stated direction: After you pass the light, bear left until you come to a bank.
Idioms
(Definition of bear from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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