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English definition of “beat”

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beat

verb  /bit/ us  

beat verb (DEFEAT)

[T] ( past tense beat, past participle beaten  /ˈbi·tən/ or beat) to defeat a competitor, or to do or be better than someone or something: In football, the Giants beat the 49ers, 17-3. Most people think that the governor will beat his opponent. The room wasn’t much, but it beat driving to a hotel 20 miles away. [T] ( past tense beat, past participle beaten  /ˈbi·tən/ or beat) To beat something that is going to happen is to take action that will prevent it from having an effect on you: I leave work early to beat the traffic.

beat verb (HIT)

[I/T] ( past tense beat, past participle beaten  /ˈbit·ən/ or beat) to hit repeatedly: [T] He looked as if he’d been beaten. [I] The children were beating on the table.

beat verb (MIX)

[T] ( past tense beat, past participle beaten  /ˈbit·ən/ or beat) to mix food with a fast circular motion: [M] Beat in the egg yolks.

beat verb (RHYTHM)

[I/T] ( past tense beat, past participle beaten  /ˈbit·ən/ or beat) to make a rhythmic sound or movement, or to hit something in rhythm to make such a sound: [I] I was so nervous I could feel my heart beating. [T] He steadily beat the drum. [I] Without calcium, your heart could not beat correctly.

beat

noun [C usually sing]  /bit/ us  

beat noun [C usually sing] (AREA)

an area for which someone, esp. a police officer, has responsibility as part of the job: People are comforted to see cops on the beat.

beat noun [C usually sing] (RHYTHM)

music the rhythmic sound in music that repeats regularly: We clapped in time to the beat.

beat

adjective  /bit/ infml us  

beat adjective (TIRED)

extremely tired: I’m beat – I’m going to bed.
(Definition of beat from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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