Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “better”

better

adjective  /ˈbet̬·ər/ us  

better adjective (HIGHER STANDARD)

of a higher standard, or more suitable, pleasing, or effective than other things or people; comparative ofgood: He sat near the front to get a better view. Relations between the two countries have never been better. She is much better at tennis than I am. Better can also be used as the comparative to form adjectives beginning with good: She’s good-looking, and her brother is even better-looking.

better

adverb  /ˈbet̬·ər/ us  

better adverb (GREATER DEGREE)

to a greater degree, or in a more suitable, pleasing, or satisfactory way; comparative ofwell: The next time he took the test, he was better prepared. I like this jacket much better than the brown one. She knows her way around the college better than I do. She did much better (= She was more successful) in the second part of the exam. If you are or get better after an illness or injury, you are healthy and no longer ill.

better

verb [T]  /ˈbet̬·ər/ fml us  

better verb [T] (IMPROVE)

to improve a situation, condition, or person: The organization was established to better conditions for the disabled.

better

noun [U]  /ˈbet̬·ər/ us  

better noun [U] (IMPROVEMENT)

used in comparisons to show that a condition is improved: The cleaner the glass is, the better you can see.
(Definition of better from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of better?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “better” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

debut

the occasion when someone performs or presents something to the public for the first time

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

ped-text verb

November 24, 2014
to text someone while walking I’m ped-texting, I’m looking down at my phone, 75 percent of the time.

Read More