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English definition of “between”

between

preposition, adverb  /bɪˈtwin/ (also in between,  /ˌɪn·bɪˈtwin/) us  

between preposition, adverb (SPACE)

[not gradable] in or into the space that separates two places, people, or objects: We live halfway between Toronto and Montreal. She squeezed in between the parked cars. [not gradable] If something is between two amounts, it is greater than the first amount but smaller than the second: She weighs between 55 and 60 pounds.

between preposition, adverb (TIME)

in the period of time that separates two different times or events: There’s a ten-minute break between classes. You should arrive between 8 and 8:30. In between sobs, he managed to tell them what had happened.

between

preposition  /bɪˈtwin/ us  

between preposition (AMONG)

shared by or involving two or more people or things: The money was divided equally between her three children. Trade between the two countries has increased sharply. There is a great deal of similarity between Caroline and her mother. Between the three of us, we were able to afford a nice graduation gift. You’ll have to choose between dinner and a movie. Next week’s game will be between the two finalists.

between preposition (CONNECTING)

connecting two or more places, things, or people: There is regular train service between New York and Philadelphia. The survey shows a link between asthma and air pollution.

between preposition (SEPARATING)

separating two places or things: The wall between East and West Berlin came down in 1989. What’s the difference between this $100 watch and the $500 one (= In what way are they different)?
(Definition of between from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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