bridge - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “bridge”

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bridge

noun  us   /brɪdʒ/

bridge noun (LARGE STRUCTURE)

[C] a structure that is built over a river, road, or railroad to allow people and vehicles to cross from one side to the other: We drove across the bridge from Brooklyn to Manhattan.

bridge noun (NOSE)

[C usually sing] the top part of the nose, between the eyes, or the piece on a pair of glasses that is supported by the top part of the nose: He rubbed the bridge of his nose.

bridge noun (MUSICAL INSTRUMENT)

[C] a small piece of wood on a musical instrument, such as a guitar or violin , over which strings are stretched

bridge noun (TEETH)

[C] (also bridgework,  /ˈbrɪdʒˌwɜrk/ ) a piece of material that keeps artificial teeth in place by being fastened to the natural teeth

bridge noun (PART OF A SHIP)

[C] the raised part of a ship on which the captain and other officers stand and from where they control the movement of the ship

bridge noun (GAME)

[U] a card game for four players who play in two pairs and try to win the cards they say they will win

bridge

verb [T]  us   /brɪdʒ/

bridge verb [T] (BUILD OVER )

to build or form a bridge over something: The shopping complex bridges a highway. If a difference is bridged, it is made smaller: Swing music bridged the gap between popular and classical music.
(Definition of bridge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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