case Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "case" - American English Dictionary

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casenoun [C]

 us   /keɪs/

case noun [C] (SITUATION)

a particular situation or example of something: We don’t normally accept credits from courses taken at another university, but we’ll make an exception in your case. It was a case of not knowing what to say. She said I refused to answer the question, but that is not the case (= that is not accurate).in case In case means if something else should happen: I think we should leave a little early, in case there’s a lot of traffic.in case of something In case of something means if something should happen, esp. something unusual or unexpected: In case of fire, go immediately to the nearest emergency exit.

case noun [C] (PROBLEM)

an item or particular matter that is being dealt with as a problem to be solved, or a person considered in this way: Your skin problem may be a mild case of eczema. He is a sad case – out of work and with few friends to help him.

case noun [C] (ARGUMENT)

arguments, facts, and reasons in support of or against something: He presented the case against cutting the military budget. law In a court of law, a case is a matter to be decided by a judge or jury (= group of people): She claimed the city’s negligence caused her accident, but she lost the case.

case noun [C] (CONTAINER)

a container used for protecting or storing things: an eyeglass case a case of seltzer

case noun [C] (GRAMMAR)

grammar the form a noun, pronoun, or adjective takes depending on its relationship to other words in a sentence: The possessive case of a noun is usually formed with the ending -’s.
(Definition of case from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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