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English definition of “challenge”

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challenge

noun  /ˈtʃæl·əndʒ/ us  

challenge noun (DIFFICULT JOB)

[C/U] something needing great mental or physical effort in order to be done successfully, or the situation of facing this kind of effort: [C] It’s a challenge being in a marriage when both partners have high-pressure jobs. [C] No matter how long you write, poetry remains a challenge. [C] Germany faces broad challenges in the coming years.

challenge noun (EXPRESSION OF DOUBT)

[C/U] a questioning or expression of doubt about the truth or purpose of something, or the right of a person to have or do something: [U] Because of the way this research was done, its findings are open to challenge. [C] The president is clearly anticipating a new challenge to his authority.

challenge noun (COMPETITION)

[C] something that competes with you or is a threat: The governor barely survived a challenge from an unknown opponent in the primary.
challenging
adjective  /ˈtʃæl·ən·dʒɪŋ/ us  
For a reporter, covering the White House is a challenging assignment.

challenge

verb [T]  /ˈtʃæl·əndʒ/ us  

challenge verb [T] (ASK TO COMPETE)

to invite someone to take part in a competition: The other candidates challenged the president to take part in a debate.

challenge verb [T] (PRESENT A DIFFICULT TEST)

to present tasks to someone that need great mental or physical effort in order to be done successfully: It’s easy enough to crank out college graduates, but a good education should really challenge them.

challenge verb [T] (EXPRESS DOUBT)

to express or represent doubt about the truth of something: Advanced computers challenge long-held notions about intelligence and thought.
(Definition of challenge from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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