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English definition of “change”

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change

verb  /tʃeɪndʒ/ us  

change verb (BECOME DIFFERENT)

[I/T] to make or become different, or to do, use, or get one thing in place of another thing: [T] I’ve changed jobs twice in the past ten years. [T] I changed my hairstyle – do you like it? [I] Attitudes about lots of things changed during the 1960s. [I] It’s surprising how fast kids change during their teen years. [I/T] To change over from one thing to something else is to stop doing or using one thing and to start doing or using another: [I] We just changed from oil heat to gas.

change verb (CLOTHES/BEDS)

[I/T] to remove one set of clothes and put a different set on yourself or someone else, such as a baby, or to remove dirty sheets from a bed and put clean ones on it: [I] I’ll just change into (= put on) something a little dressier. [T] Could you change the baby/the baby’s diaper (= put on a clean one)? [T] I changed the sheets/the bed (= the sheets on the bed) in the guest room.

change verb (MONEY)

[T] to get or give money in exchange for money, either because you want it in smaller units, or because you want the same value in foreign money: Can you change a $100 bill for me? I had to change some American money into pesetas before I arrived in Spain.

change verb (TRANSPORT)

[I/T] to get off an aircraft, train, bus, etc. and catch another in order to continue a trip: [T] I had to change planes twice to get there. [I] Change at Hartford for the train to Springfield.

change

noun  /tʃeɪndʒ/ us  

change noun (BECOMING DIFFERENT)

a change A change often refers to something unusual or new that is better or more pleasant than what existed before: We decided we needed a change, so we went to Florida for a couple of weeks. Why don’t we eat on the porch for a change?

change noun (MONEY)

[U] the difference in money, returned to the buyer, between what is paid for something and the lesser amount that it costs: It costs $17 and you gave me $20, so here’s your $3 change. [U] Change also refers to smaller units of money whose total value is equal to that of a larger unit: I need change for a $50 bill because I want to take a taxi. Do you have change for/of a dollar? [U] Change can refer to coins rather than bills: Bring a lot of change for using the public telephones.

change noun (CLOTHES/BEDS)

[C] a set of clothes that is additional to the clothes that you are wearing: Bring a change of clothes with you in case we stay overnight.
(Definition of change from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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