come - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “come”

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come

verb  us   /kʌm/ (past tense came  /keɪm/ , past participle come)

come verb (APPROACH)

[I] to move or travel toward the speaker or with the speaker: Will you come here, please? Did you come here by car? Come on in! The water’s great. Are you coming over to my house tonight? Is he coming to the movies with us? The man is coming to fix the dryer this afternoon. He came rushing over when I fell.

come verb (MOVE TO LISTENER)

[I] to move or travel in the direction of the person being spoken to: I thought I’d come and see your new house. I’ve come to read the gas meter.

come verb (ARRIVE)

[I] to get to a particular place: Has the mail come yet? Spring came early this yearlook at all the flowers! [I] When something comes in it is received: Reports are just coming in of the fire.

come verb (BE FROM)

[I always + adv/prep] to be or start from a particular place: She comes from Italy. Does that quotation come from Shakespeare?

come verb (EXIST)

[I always + adv/prep] to exist or be available: The dress comes in three sizessmall, medium, and large. This cuddly doll comes with her own blanket and bottle.

come verb (HAPPEN)

[I] to happen: Your birthday only comes around once a year. [+ to infinitive] How did you two come to be friends? The earthquake's aftereffects came without warning.

come verb (ORDER)

[I always + adv/prep] to be in a particular relation to others in an order: April comes before May. In your cookbook you’ll see that pies come under the heading "Desserts." [I always + adv/prep] If something comes under an official organization, that organization is responsible for it: Snow removal comes under the highway department.

come verb (CHANGE)

to change or be in a different position or condition: [I always + adv/prep] The stitching on my briefcase is coming apart. [L] A wire had come loose at the back. [I always + adv/prep] He pulled the knob and it came off in his hand. [+ to infinitive] I couldn’t stand him at first, but I’ve come to like him.
coming
adjective  us   /ˈkʌm·ɪŋ/
We look forward to even greater success in the coming year.
(Definition of come from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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