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English definition of “cost”

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cost

noun  /kɔst, kɑst/ us  

cost noun (MONEY)

[C/U] the amount of money needed to buy, do, or make something, or an amount spent for something: [C] Education costs continue to rise. [U] Most computers come with software included at no extra cost. [U] The area has both high-cost and low-cost housing. [C/U] law Costs is the money given to a person who wins a legal case to pay for the cost of taking the matter to a law court.

cost noun (SOMETHING GIVEN OR LOST)

[U] that which is given, needed, or lost in order to obtain something: The fire cost 14 people their lives.

cost

verb [T]  /kɔst/ ( past tense and past participle cost) us  

cost verb [T] (PAY MONEY)

to need you to pay a particular amount of money in order for you to buy or do something: The trip will cost (you) $1000. It costs a lot to buy a house these days.

cost verb [T] (GIVE OR LOSE SOMETHING)

to be forced to give or lose something in order to obtain something: If you give him a chance to hit the ball, it could cost you the ballgame.
Translations of “cost”
in Korean 비용…
in Arabic كُلْفة…
in French coûter, évaluer le coût de…
in Turkish maliyet, tutar, fiyat…
in Italian costo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 錢, 價格, 費用…
in Russian цена, стоимость, расплата…
in Polish koszt, cena…
in Spanish costar, calcular el coste de…
in Portuguese custo, gasto…
in German kosten, kalkulieren…
in Catalan cost, preu…
in Japanese 費用…
in Chinese (Simplified) 钱, 价格, 费用…
(Definition of cost from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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