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English definition of “diet”

diet

noun [C/U]  /ˈdɑɪ·ɪt/ us  
the food and drink usually taken by a person or group: [C] A healthy diet includes fresh vegetables. [C] fig. Gifted students given a steady diet of grade-level curriculum learn they don’t need to work hard. A diet is also the particular food and drink you are limited to when you cannot eat or drink whatever you want to: [C] a low-salt diet [C] I’m going on a diet because I’ve got to lose some weight.
dietary
adjective  /ˈdɑɪ·ɪˌter·i/ us  
Health experts say dietary changes have to start with children, who can be taught to appreciate a healthy diet.

diet

verb [I]  /ˈdɑɪ·ɪt/ us  
to limit the food that you take, esp. in order to lose weight: He began dieting a month ago and says he has lost ten pounds already.
dieter
noun [C]  /ˈdɑɪ·ɪ·t̬ər/ us  
Studies show there may be as many as 30 million American dieters at any one moment.

diet

adjective [not gradable]  /ˈdɑɪ·ɪt/ us  
(of food or drink) containing much less sugar than usual and often sweetened artificially, or containing less fat than usual: diet soda
(Definition of diet from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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