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English definition of “direct”

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direct

adjective  /dəˈrekt, dɑɪ-/ us  

direct adjective (STRAIGHT)

going in a straight line toward somewhere or someone without stopping or changing direction and without anything coming in between: Is there a direct flight to Madison, or do we have to change planes in Chicago? This plant should be kept out of direct sunlight. Direct also means without anyone or anything else being involved: She fired the principal and took direct control of the school. Direct also means very honest in saying what you mean: Her manner was businesslike and direct.

direct

verb  /dəˈrekt, dɑɪ-/ us  

direct verb (AIM)

[T always + adv/prep] to aim something in a particular direction or at particular people: His criticism was directed at everybody who disagreed with him. [T always + adv/prep] To direct is also to show someone the particular way to get somewhere: Can you direct me to the nearest bus stop?

direct verb (CONTROL)

[I/T] to control or be in charge of an activity, organization, etc.: [T] General Eisenhower directed the allied forces in World War II. [I/T] When someone directs a movie, play, etc., that person tells the actors how to play their parts.

direct verb (ORDER)

[T] fml to give an order or instruction to someone: The judge directed the defendant to be quiet.

direct

adverb  /dəˈrekt, dɑɪ-/ us  

direct adverb (WITHOUT INVOLVING OTHERS)

without anything or anyone else being involved: Can I dial this number direct or do I have to go through the operator?
(Definition of direct from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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