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English definition of “down”

down

preposition, adverb [not gradable]  /dɑʊn/ us  

down preposition, adverb [not gradable] (IN A LOWER POSITION)

in or toward a low or lower position, from a higher one: There’s a bathroom down the stairs and to the right. He poured the rest of the coffee down the drain. The cat jumped down from the chair. Please sit down (= stop standing and come to a sitting position). If you feel ill, why don’t you lie down (= stop standing and come to a lying position) for a while? Down also means to the ground, esp. as a result of an action that causes something to fall: We’re going to have to cut down this tree. Down also means firmly, in a fixed position, esp. as a result of an action: Workers in the convention center taped down the edges of the carpets. fig. We hope to nail down the agreement at tomorrow’s meeting.

down

adjective, adverb [not gradable]  /dɑʊn/ us  

down adjective, adverb [not gradable] (AT A LOWER LEVEL)

in or toward a lower place or level, a smaller amount, or a simpler state: Unemployment went down last month, dropping to under 6%. Lots of stores are having sales, and prices are coming down. He was down to his last $5 (= that was all he had left). Down is used with a lot of verbs to show that something is becoming smaller, weaker, slower, or less: The fire burned down. She’s slimmed down a lot in the past few months. Would you please turn down the music – it’s too loud.

down adjective, adverb [not gradable] (WORSE)

into a worse position or state: Michigan, down (by) (= losing by) ten points at the half, came back to win the football game.

down

adverb [not gradable]  /dɑʊn/ us  

down adverb [not gradable] (FAR AWAY)

used, esp. with prepositions, to emphasize that a place is far from the speaker or in or toward the south: I’ll meet you down at the health club after work. My parents moved down to Florida after they retired.

down adverb [not gradable] (IN WRITING)

in writing or on paper: He agreed to the deal, but until we get it down on paper, we don’t have a legal contract.

down adverb [not gradable] (WHEN BUYING)

at the time of buying: She paid $100 down and the rest in installments.

down

preposition  /dɑʊn/ us  

down preposition (ALONG)

along: Her office is down the hall on the right.

down

adjective  /dɑʊn/ us  

down adjective (UNHAPPY)

unhappy: I’m feeling a little down, I guess because most people have gone home for the holidays and I’m still here.

down adjective (NOT IN OPERATION)

[not gradable] (of a system or machine, esp. a computer) not in operation or not working, usually only for a limited period of time: The network will be down until noon today.

down

noun [U]  /dɑʊn/ us  

down noun [U] (HAIR)

small, soft feathers or hair, esp. those of a young bird

down

verb [T]  /dɑʊn/ us  

down verb [T] (EAT)

to eat or drink something quickly: She quickly downed her tea and left to catch the bus.
(Definition of down from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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