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English definition of “dream”

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dream

noun [C]  /drim/ us  

dream noun [C] (SLEEP)

the activities, images, and feelings experienced by the mind during sleep: In the dream I had last night, someone was chasing me, but I didn’t know who it was.

dream noun [C] (HOPE)

an event or condition that you hope for very much, although it is not likely to happen: It was his dream to be a dancer. Dream is sometimes used before a noun when you want to say that something is almost perfect: If there were one more bedroom, it would be my dream house.

dream

verb  /drim/ ( past tense and past participle dreamed  /drimd, dremt/ or dreamt  /dremt/) us  

dream verb (SEE IMAGES)

to experience activities, images, and feelings in your mind during sleep: [I] What did you dream about last night? [+ that clause] I dreamed that I was in a boat on a big lake, and I was trying to get back to land.

dream verb (HOPE)

[I] to desire something very much and hope that it happens: Ever since that defeat, he had dreamed of revenge.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “dream”
in Korean 꿈, (희망)꿈…
in Arabic حُلْم…
in French rêve, rêverie, merveille…
in Turkish rüya, hayal…
in Italian sogno…
in Chinese (Traditional) 睡覺, 夢,睡夢,夢境…
in Russian сон, мечта…
in Polish sen, marzenie…
in Spanish sueño, maravilla, deseo…
in Portuguese sonho…
in German der Traum, die Träumerei, der Wunschtraum…
in Catalan somni…
in Japanese (寝ている時に見る)夢, (将来の)夢…
in Chinese (Simplified) 睡觉, 梦,睡梦,梦境…
(Definition of dream from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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