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English definition of “even”

even

adjective  /ˈi·vən/ us  

even adjective (EQUAL)

equal or equally balanced: The class has a pretty even mix of boys and girls. I bought the tickets, so if you pay for dinner we’ll be even (= you will not owe me any money).

even adjective (CONTINUOUS)

continuous or regular: We walked at an even pace.

even adjective (FLAT)

flat and smooth, or on the same level: The snow was even with the kitchen doorstep.

even adjective (NUMBER)

[not gradable] (of numbers) able to be exactly divided by two: The result should be an even number.

even

adverb [not gradable]  /ˈi·vən/ us  

even adverb [not gradable] (EMPHASIS)

used to emphasize a comparison or the unexpected or extreme characteristic of something: Even smart people can make mistakes. She never cried – not even when she was badly hurt. Even with a good education, you need some common sense to get ahead. The new service is one of the most useful and popular on the Web. Even better, it's free to use.

even adverb [not gradable] (MORE EXACTLY)

used when you want to be more exact or detailed about something you have just said: I’d like to get a place in the Rocky Mountains, maybe Colorado or Montana – Idaho even.

even

verb [I/T]  /ˈi·vən/ us  

even verb [I/T] (EQUAL)

to make equal: [T] Tonight’s win evens their record at 6-6. [M] They won the next night to even up the score. [M] Taking me to the movies isn’t going to even things out.
(Definition of even from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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