exposure Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "exposure" - American English Dictionary

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exposurenoun

 us   /ɪkˈspoʊ·ʒər/

exposure noun (HARMFUL CONDITION)

[U] a situation or condition that makes someone likely to be harmed, esp. because the person has not been protected from something dangerous: A federal court jury found the workers had been harmed by prolonged exposure to asbestos fibers. Avoid prolonged exposure to sunlight. [U] Exposure is also a serious medical condition that is caused by being outside without protection from the weather.

exposure noun (OPPORTUNITY)

[U] the conditions that make available an opportunity to learn or experience new things: Additional exposure to the Japanese language was provided at meals. Students deserve exposure to creative teachers.

exposure noun (PUBLIC ATTENTION)

[U] the attention given to someone or something by television, newspapers, magazines, etc.: More races means more exposure for the team. He gained wide exposure in both the print and sound media.

exposure noun (MAKE PUBLIC)

[U] the act of stating facts publicly that show that someone is dishonest or dangerous: Party officials have succeeded in keeping a lid on exposure of the senator’s misdeeds.

exposure noun (DIRECTION)

[C usually sing] the condition of facing in (a stated direction): [C] Our dining room has a southern exposure, so we get plenty of sun.

exposure noun (PHOTOGRAPH)

[C] one of the positions in a strip of film that can produce a photograph: Get a roll of film with 36 exposures.
(Definition of exposure from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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