Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “fine”

fine

adjective, adverb [not gradable]  /fɑɪn/ us  

fine adjective, adverb [not gradable] (SATISFACTORY)

very good or very well; satisfactory or satisfactorily: I was sick last night, but I feel fine this morning. The apartments are very small, which is fine if you’re single. The car was working fine yesterday. "Is something wrong?" "No, everything’s just fine, thanks."

fine

adjective [-er/-est only]  /fɑɪn/ us  

fine adjective [-er/-est only] (EXCELLENT)

of excellent quality or much better than average: Although still young, he is already a fine musician. We had lunch in one of the city’s finest restaurants. Fine is sometimes used with an opposite meaning to show that you are annoyed: That’s a fine thing to say after all I’ve done for you.

fine adjective [-er/-est only] (THIN)

very thin or in very small grains or drops: fine blond hair The paint comes out of the can in a fine spray. She has her mother’s fine (= delicate and beautiful) features.

fine

noun [C]  /fɑɪn/ us  

fine noun [C] (PUNISHMENT)

an amount of money that has to be paid as a punishment for not obeying a rule or law: If found guilty, he faces six months in jail and a heavy fine.
fine
verb [T]  /fɑɪn/ us  
They fined him $125 for driving through a red light.
(Definition of fine from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of fine?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “fine” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

long time no see

said when you meet someone who you haven't seen for a long period of time

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Read More