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English definition of “fire”

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fire

noun  /fɑɪər/ us  

fire noun (FLAMES)

[C/U] the state of burning, or a burning mass of material: [U] The factory had to be closed because the risk of fire was too great. [C] There have been a lot of forest fires because of the drought. [C] The library was badly damaged in the fire. [U] The theater was destroyed by fire. [C] Over a hundred volunteers were needed to put out the fire (= stop it). [C/U] A fire is also a small controlled mass of burning material that is used for heating or cooking: [C] Light a fire in the fireplace.on fire If something is on fire, it is burning, esp. when it is not meant to be: By the time the firefighters arrived, the whole house was on fire.

fire noun (SHOOTING)

[U] the act of shooting bullets or other explosives from a weapon: The troops were ordered to cease fire (= stop shooting). The soldiers opened fire (= started shooting).

fire noun (EMOTION)

[U] strong emotion: The fire in her speech inspired everyone to carry on in spite of recent setbacks.

fire

verb  /fɑɪər/ us  

fire verb (SHOOT)

[I/T] to shoot bullets or other explosives from a weapon: [T] He fired his gun into the air. [I] The soldiers began firing. [T] fig. The journalists kept firing questions at the president (= asking him questions quickly one after the other). [I] fig. "I’d like to ask you some personal questions." "Fire away (= You can start immediately)!"

fire verb (LOSE JOB)

[T] to order someone to give up his or her job: She was fired for stealing from her employer.

fire verb (EXCITE)

[T] to cause a strong emotion in someone: She’s all fired up (= excited) about going to college.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of fire from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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