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English definition of “firm”

firm

adjective, adverb [-er/-est only]  /fɜrm/ us  

firm adjective, adverb [-er/-est only] (FIXED)

set in place and unable or unlikely to move, come loose, or fall over: The rocks were wet, and we couldn’t get a firm footing. fig. Sometimes it takes more courage to admit you’re wrong than to stand firm (= continue to defend an opinion). fig. The dean is holding firm and refusing to give in to student demands.

firm

adjective [-er/-est only]  /fɜrm/ us  

firm adjective [-er/-est only] (HARD)

not soft when pressed; solid or strong: a firm mattress a firm body fig. No one seems to have a firm grip on (= be in control of) the situation at the moment.

firm adjective [-er/-est only] (CERTAIN)

certain or fixed in a belief, opinion, etc., and unlikely to change, or so certain as to be beyond doubt or question: a firm believer in the Constitution They made a firm commitment to complete the job this week. The decision is firm – there will be a strike. Firm can also mean showing control and making sure you will be obeyed: A new teacher has to be firm with her students.

firm

noun [C]  /fɜrm/ us  

firm noun [C] (BUSINESS)

a company or business: a law firm
(Definition of firm from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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