float - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “float”

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float

verb  us   /floʊt/

float verb (MOVE ON LIQUID)

[I/T] to stay or move easily on or over the surface of a liquid, or to cause something to move in this way: [I] An empty bottle will float on water. [I] I’d float around for hours, just fishing. [T] Fill the cups with hot coffee and float heavy cream on top. [I] We spent a lazy afternoon floating down the river. [I] fig. She removes the pins and her hair floats (= moves gracefully) down around her. [I] fig. Reports have been floating around (= heard from various people) that the company might be for sale. [I/T] Float also means to move easily through air: [I] Fluffy white clouds were floating across the sky.

float verb (MONEY)

[T] to sell bonds (= official papers given to people who lend money to a government or company): Cities float bond issues that are payable from property taxes.

float

noun [C]  us   /floʊt/

float noun [C] (VEHICLE)

a large vehicle that is decorated and used in parades (= public celebrations in which people march, walk, and ride along a planned route): Marching bands and elaborate floats will be featured in the parade.

float noun [C] (DRINK)

a sweet drink with ice cream floating in it: a root beer float

float noun [C] (MOVE ON LIQUID)

a piece of light material that stays on the surface of water: the float in a toilet tank
(Definition of float from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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