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English definition of “form”

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form

verb  /fɔrm/ us  

form verb (COME TOGETHER)

[I/T] to come together and make a particular order or shape: [+ to infinitive] A crowd formed to watch the fire. [T] Please form a single line. [T] The geese flying overhead formed a V-shaped pattern.

form verb (BEGIN HAVING)

[T] to begin to have: I formed the opinion that I was not really welcome there any more.

form verb (BEGIN)

[T] to begin something, esp. organizing people or things: We formed a community group to help people who are sick or disabled. They formed a new publishing company.

form

noun

form noun (TYPE)

   /fɔrm/ [C] a type or kind of something, or the particular way in which something exists: I was always more interested in poetry than in other forms of literature. She has a mild form of the flu and should be OK in a few days. The medicine comes in the form of a liquid or pills.

form noun (SHAPE/APPEARANCE)

   /fɔrm/ [C] the shape or appearance of something: The stadium was in the form of a circle.

form noun (DOCUMENT)

   /fɔrm/ [C] something, usually paper, that has spaces marked where you fill in information: Fill out an application form and we will let you know if a job opens up.

form noun (ART/MUSIC)

literature /fɔrm/ [C] the organization, shape, and structure of a written work art, music /fɔrm/ [C] Form in a work of art or piece of music is the design or arrangement of it that it shares with other works of the same type

form noun (BEHAVIOR)

   /fɔrm/ [U] the way in which someone does something: He was in great form and won the golf tournament by 7 strokes.
(Definition of form from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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