fresh - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “fresh”

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fresh

adjective  us   /freʃ/

fresh adjective (RECENTLY GROWN/COOKED)

[-er/-est only] (of food or flowers) recently picked, made, or cooked: fresh fruit/vegetables fresh-baked bread Elise is in the garden cutting some fresh flowers for the table. There’s a fresh pot of coffee on the stove. [-er/-est only] Fresh food is also food in a natural condition rather than artificially preserved by a process such as freezing.

fresh adjective (RECENT)

[-er/-est only] recently made or done, and not yet changed by time: The events of last year are still fresh in people’s minds.

fresh adjective (DIFFERENT)

different or additional; replacing what exists: He’s got a fresh way of looking at old material.

fresh adjective (COOL)

[-er/-est only] (of air) clean and cool, in a way thought typical of air away from cities and outside buildings: How can we keep the kids indoors when they want to play in the fresh air?

fresh adjective (CLEAN)

[-er/-est only] clean and pleasant: fresh bed linens the fresh smell of pine trees

fresh adjective (NOT SALTY)

[not gradable] (of water) from rivers and lakes and therefore not salty: Rainfall is the sole source of the island’s fresh water.

fresh adjective (NOT TIRED)

[-er/-est only] energetic and enthusiastic; not tired: I awoke feeling fresh and ready to go.

fresh adjective (TOO CONFIDENT)

[-er/-est only] being too confident and showing a lack of respect: Don’t get fresh with me, young woman!
(Definition of fresh from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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