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English definition of “from”

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from

preposition  /frʌm, frɑm, frəm/ us  

from preposition (PLACE)

used to show the place where someone or something starts moving or traveling: He took a handkerchief from his pocket. She ran away from home. The boy cried and cried, rocking from side to side (= to the left and right).

from preposition (TIME)

used to show the time when something starts or the time when it was made or first existed: Here’s a song from the 60s. I’m leaving a week from Thursday (= one week after Thursday). The class ends at 2:30 and from then on (= starting at that time and then continuing) I’ll be at the library.

from preposition (DISTANCE)

used to show the distance between two places: We’re about a mile from home.

from preposition (ORIGIN)

used to show the origin of something or someone: I heard music coming from my room. Someone from the bank just called. Where are you from? US Route 1 runs from Maine to Florida.

from preposition (MATERIAL)

used to show the material of which something is made: The desk is made from pine.

from preposition (RANGE)

used to show where a range of numbers, prices, or items begins: Tickets will cost from $10 to $45. Everyone from the oldest to the youngest had a good time.

from preposition (CHANGE)

used to show the original state of someone or something that is changing or has changed: She has been promoted from manager to vice president. Things went from bad to worse.

from preposition (CAUSE)

used to show the cause of something or the reason why something happens: Your child will benefit from piano lessons.

from preposition (CONSIDER)

used to show the facts or opinions you consider before making a judgment or decision: From looking at the clouds, I would say it’s going to rain later. It’s cheap, but not very good from a quality standpoint.

from preposition (REDUCE)

used to show that a larger amount is being reduced by a smaller amount: Three from sixteen is thirteen.

from preposition (DIFFERENCE)

used to show a difference between two people or things: It’s hard to tell one sister from the other.

from preposition (PROTECTION)

used to show what someone is being protected against: They found shelter from the storm under a large oak tree.

from preposition (PREVENTION)

used to show what someone cannot do or know, or what cannot happen: High rents keep us from moving to a larger apartment.
(Definition of from from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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