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English definition of “good”

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good

adjective  /ɡʊd/ us  

good adjective (SATISFACTORY)

( comparative better  /ˈbet̬·ər/, superlative best  /best/) of a kind that is pleasing or enjoyable, or of high quality: Let’s go on a picnic tomorrow if the weather’s good. That was a really good meal. Dogs have a very good sense of smell. Now would be a good time (= a suitable time) to talk to Andy about the promotion. He’s a good (= able and skillful) swimmer. Did they have a good time on their vacation? She makes good money (= earns a high income) in her new job.

good adjective (MORALLY RIGHT)

( comparative better  /ˈbet̬·ər/, superlative best  /best/) morally right or admirable: José is a genuinely good person. If you’re a good boy (= if you behave well) at the dentist, I’ll buy you some ice cream later. He’s always been good to his mother. ( comparative better  /ˈbet̬·ər/, superlative best  /best/) Good can be used as part of an exclamation: Good heavens! You mean they still haven’t arrived?

good adjective (WITH GREETING)

good adjective (FOR HEALTH)

( comparative better  /ˈbet̬·ər/, superlative best  /best/) useful for health, or in a satisfactory condition: Make sure you eat plenty of good, fresh vegetables.

good adjective (LARGE)

[not gradable] large in number or amount: We had to walk a good way in the airport to reach our gate. There was a good-sized crowd on hand. There was a good deal of (= a lot of) discussion about how much the car was worth.
good
noun [U]  /ɡʊd/ us  
Even a small donation can do a lot of good.
(Definition of good from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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