Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “ground”

ground

 /ɡrɑʊnd/ us  

ground (CRUSH)

past simple and past participle of grind

ground

noun  /ɡrɑʊnd/ us  

ground noun (LAND)

[U] the surface of the earth or of a piece of land: We laid a blanket on the ground for our picnic.

ground noun (AREA OF KNOWLEDGE)

[U] an area of knowledge or experience; a subject: This teacher just keeps going over the same ground again and again.

ground noun (CAUSE)

[C usually pl] a reason, cause, or argument: [+ that clause] He refused to answer on the grounds that he’d promised to keep it secret.

ground noun (WIRE)

[C] a connection between a piece of electrical equipment and the earth, or a wire that makes this connection [C] A ground is also an object that holds a very large number of electrons, and can accept or supply more when there is an electric current.

ground

verb [T]  /ɡrɑʊnd/ us  

ground verb [T] (PUNISH)

infml to punish an older child by not allowing the child to go out or be involved in social activities: My parents grounded me for a week.

ground verb [T] (CAUSE)

to have a reason, cause, or argument for your actions or beliefs: His beliefs are grounded in his experience.

ground verb [T] (LAND)

to put or keep on the ground: All flights have been grounded because of the snowstorm.
(Definition of ground from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of ground?
Browse related topics

You are looking at an entry to do with Work, working and the workplace, but you might be interested in these topics from the Working topic area:

Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “ground” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

give the green light to sth

to give permission for someone to do something or for something to happen

Word of the Day

Highly delighted, bitterly disappointed, ridiculously cheap: adverbs for emphasis.

by Liz Walter,
October 22, 2014
We often make adjectives stronger by putting an adverb in front of them. The most common ones are very and, for a stronger meaning, extremely: He was very pleased. The ship is extremely large. However, we don’t use very or extremely for adjectives that already have a strong meaning, for example fantastic,

Read More 

life tracking noun

October 20, 2014
the use of one or more devices or apps to monitor health, exercise, how time is spent, etc.

Read More