hail - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “hail”

See all translations

hail

noun [U]  us   /heɪl/

hail noun [U] (ICE)

small, hard balls of ice that fall from the sky like rain A hail of things is a lot of them directed toward someone: After his speech he faced a hail of questions from reporters.

hail

verb  us   /heɪl/

hail verb (CALL)

[T] to call and attract the attention of someone: You wait here with our bags while I hail a taxi.

hail verb (PRAISE)

[T] to publicly praise or show approval for a person or an achievement: Heppner has been hailed as one of the finest tenors in the operatic world today.

hail verb (FALL AS ICE)

[I] If it hails, small, hard balls of ice fall from the sky: It hailed for a few minutes this morning.
Phrasal verbs
Translations of “hail”
in Arabic بَرَد…
in Korean 싸락눈, 우박…
in Malaysian ketulan hujan batu, hujan…
in French grêle, pluie…
in Turkish (hava durumu) dolu halinde yağmak…
in Italian grandine…
in Chinese (Traditional) 雹,冰雹…
in Russian град…
in Polish grad…
in Vietnamese trận mưa đá, hàng loạt…
in Spanish granizo, lluvia…
in Portuguese granizo, chuva de pedra…
in Thai ลูกเห็บ, ลูกเห็บตก…
in German der Hagel…
in Catalan calamarsa, pedra…
in Japanese ひょう, あられ…
in Indonesian hujan es, hujan…
in Chinese (Simplified) 雹,冰雹…
(Definition of hail from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of hail?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “hail” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

force

physical, especially violent, strength, or power

Word of the Day

They sometimes go here and they never go there: using adverbs of frequency

by Liz Walter,
April 29, 2015
Sometimes, always, often, never: these are some of the most common words in English.  Unfortunately, they are also some of the words that cause the most problems for students. Many of my students put them in the wrong place, often because that’s where they go in their own languages. They say things

Read More 

Evel abbreviation

May 04, 2015
English votes for English laws; the idea that only English (as opposed to Scottish, Welsh or Irish) MPs should be allowed to vote for laws that affect only England Yet these are the two principal constitutional proposals that have come from the Conservative party in its kneejerk response to Ukip’s English nationalism and

Read More