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English definition of “heat”

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heat

noun

heat noun (TEMPERATURE)

   /hit/ [U] warmth, esp. a lot of warmth: the heat of the sun physics    /hit/ [U] Heat is also a form of energy that a substance has because of the movement of its molecules or atoms.    /hit/ [U] The heat can also mean hot weather: I thought I’d like living in Florida, but the heat was too much for me.    /hit/ [U] The heat is also the system in a building or a stove that controls the temperature: I’m freezing – can you turn up the heat? Lower the heat when the water starts to boil.

heat noun (POWER)

physics /hit/ [U] a type of energy that moves from one object or substance to another because of their difference in temperature

heat noun (EMOTION)

   /hit/ [U] a state of strong emotion, esp. excitement or anger: The heat of his own argument swept him away. John apologized for the remarks he had made in the heat of the moment (= while he was angry or excited).

heat noun (RESPONSIBILITY)

   /hit/ [U] responsibility or blame: We took a lot of heat for showing that on TV.

heat noun (COMPETITION)

   /hit/ [C] a competition, esp. a race, in which it is decided who will compete in the final event

heat noun (BIOLOGY)

in heat biology If an animal, esp. a female, is in heat, it is ready to breed.

heat

verb [T]  /hit/ us  

heat verb [T] (TEMPERATURE)

to make a place or thing warm: It costs a lot to heat this house. Heat the sauce in the microwave.
Phrasal verbs
(Definition of heat from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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