Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “honor”

See all translations

honor

noun ( Cdn Br honour)  /ˈɑn·ər/ us  

honor noun (RESPECT)

[U] great respect for someone, or the feeling of pride and pleasure resulting when respect is shown to you: It is an honor to meet you. The dinner is in honor of (= to show respect for) a colleague who is leaving.Your/His/Her Honor Your/His/Her Honor is a title of respect for a judge or mayor (= elected official).

honor noun (CHARACTER)

[U] a good character, or a reputation for honesty and fair dealing: David has always been a man of honor. On my honor (= Asking you to trust my reputation for honesty), I never said that.

honor noun (REWARD)

[C] a public reward to show appreciation for unusual achievement: She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor.

honor

verb [T] ( Cdn Br honour)  /ˈɑn·ər/ us  

honor verb [T] (SHOW RESPECT)

to show great respect for someone, esp. in public: We are honored (= proud and pleased) that you have come to speak to our students.

honor verb [T] (REWARD)

to give someone a public reward to show appreciation for unusual achievement: Today we honor those who died defending our country.

honor verb [T] (FULFILL)

to fulfill an existing agreement or promise, or to accept a form of payment: The governor honored her pledge to cut taxes.
Translations of “honor”
in Chinese (Traditional) 獎勵, 榮譽…
in Russian см. honour…
in Turkish şeref, namus, onur…
in Chinese (Simplified) 奖励, 荣誉…
in Polish -…
(Definition of honor from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of honor?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More American English definitions for “honor”

Definitions of “honor” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

thug

a man who acts violently, especially to commit a crime

Word of the Day

The way we move (Verbs for walking and running)

by Kate Woodford,
March 25, 2015
​​​ This week we’re looking at interesting ways to describe the way that people move. Most of the verbs that we’ll be considering describe how fast or slow people move. Others describe the attitude or state of mind of the person walking or running. Some describe both. Starting with verbs for walking slowly,

Read More 

crossfit noun

March 23, 2015
high-intensity strength training Two women in strappy dresses discussed how much weight they could snatch

Read More