into - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “into”

See all translations

into

preposition  us   /ˈɪn·tu, -tə/

into preposition (INSIDE)

toward the inside or middle of something and about to be contained, surrounded, or enclosed by it: Pour some sugar into the bowl. They went into the backyard.

into preposition (CONNECTED WITH)

connected with or involved in a condition or activity: My father went into the army the day after the war began. An investigation into the accident is underway. I know I should do my taxes but I just don’t want to get into it now. infml Into also means strongly interested in or involved with something: Jeanne is heavily into music. Ken is into long-distance running.

into preposition (CHANGE)

used to show when a person or thing is changing from one form or condition to another: Peel the potatoes and chop them into small cubes. We made the extra bedroom into an office. Her novels have been translated into nineteen languages.

into preposition (MOVEMENT)

used to show movement that involves two things coming together with force: The driver apparently fell asleep and his car slammed into a tree. fig. Guess who I ran into (= met unexpectedly) at the shopping mall!

into preposition (DIVISION)

used when referring to the division of one number by another number: 5 into 10 is 2.
(Definition of into from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of into?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “into” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

paradox

a situation or statement that seems impossible or is difficult to understand because it contains two opposite facts or characteristics

Word of the Day

What’s All The Commotion About? (Words to describe sounds)

by Kate Woodford,
May 20, 2015
​​​ In this post we look at a range of words and phrases that we use to describe noise and the absence of noise. Starting with complete quiet, we sometimes use the noun hush to describe silence: A hush fell over the room as the bride walked in./There was a deathly hush (=complete

Read More 

plyscraper noun

May 18, 2015
a skyscraper made mainly from wood The development of engineered timber could herald a new era of eco-friendly ‘plyscrapers’. Christchurch welcomed its first multistorey timber structure this year, there are plans for Vancouver, and the talk is China could follow

Read More