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English definition of “joint”

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joint

adjective [not gradable]  /dʒɔɪnt/ us  

joint adjective [not gradable] (SHARED)

belonging to or shared between two or more people: Do you and your husband have a joint bank account or separate accounts? In court, the parents were awarded joint custody of their son (= the right to care for him was shared between them).joint venture A joint venture is a business that gets its money from two or more partners.
jointly
adverb [not gradable]  /ˈdʒɔɪnt·li/ us  
Construction of the new high school will be jointly funded by the city and the state.

joint

noun [C]  /dʒɔɪnt/ us  

joint noun [C] (BODY PART)

a place in the body where two bones meet: Good running shoes are supposed to reduce the stress on the ankle, knee, and hip joints.

joint noun [C] (CONNECTION)

a place where two things are joined together: Metal joints in the bridge allow it to expand or contract with changes in air temperature.

joint noun [C] (PLACE)

slang a cheap restaurant: a hamburger joint slang A joint is also a place where people go for some type of entertainment: a jazz joint
Translations of “joint”
in Korean 공동의…
in Arabic مُشْتَرَك…
in French raccord, articulation, rôti…
in Turkish ortak…
in Italian congiunto, comune…
in Chinese (Traditional) 共有的,共用的, 共同的…
in Russian совместный…
in Polish wspólny…
in Spanish junta, juntura, unión…
in Portuguese conjunto, mútuo…
in German die Verbindungsstelle, das Gelenk, das Bratenstück…
in Catalan conjunt…
in Japanese 合同の, 共同の…
in Chinese (Simplified) 共有的,共享的, 共同的…
(Definition of joint from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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