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English definition of “knot”

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knot

noun [C]  /nɑt/ us  

knot noun [C] (FASTENING)

a fastening made by tying together a piece or pieces of string, rope, cloth, etc.: Wrap this string around the package and then tie a knot. fig. She’s so nervous, her stomach is in knots (= feels tight and uncomfortable).

knot noun [C] (GROUP)

a group of people or things: After the game, disappointed knots of people drifted away.

knot noun [C] (WOOD)

a hard, dark area on a tree or piece of wood where a branch was joined to the tree

knot noun [C] (MEASUREMENT)

a measure of speed for ships, aircraft, or movements of water and air equal to approximately 6076 feet (1.85 kilometers) an hour
knot
verb [I/T]  /nɑt/ (-tt-) us  
[T] He knotted his tie carefully.
Translations of “knot”
in Korean 매듭…
in Arabic عُقْدة…
in French noeud, groupe…
in Turkish düğüm, deniz mili, uçak…
in Italian nodo…
in Chinese (Traditional) 繫結物, (繩等的)結…
in Russian узел, узел (количество морских миль в час)…
in Polish węzeł, supeł…
in Spanish nudo, grupo, corrillo…
in Portuguese nó…
in German der Knoten, der Astknorren, der Haufen…
in Catalan nus…
in Japanese 結び目…
in Chinese (Simplified) 系结物, (绳等的)结…
(Definition of knot from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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