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English definition of “league”

league

noun [C]  /liɡ/ us  

league noun [C] (SPORTS)

a group of teams or players in a sport who take part in competitions against each other: Our team has the worst record in the league. Do you belong to a bowling league? A league is also a group in which all the players, people, or things are on approximately the same level: His new movie is just not in the same league as his last one (= not as good as the one before).

league noun [C] (ORGANIZATION)

a group of people or countries that join together because they have the same interest: the League of Nations in league with fml If someone is in league with someone else, they have agreed secretly to do something together, esp. something illegal or wrong: They were in league with their accountants to cheat the government by hiding their real income.
(Definition of league from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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