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English definition of “like”

like

verb  /lɑɪk/ us  

like verb (ENJOY)

[T] to enjoy or approve of something or someone, or to prefer something a particular way: I like your new haircut. Do you like fish? I like taking my time in the morning. I like my music loud. [T] Like can be used with "how" when asking for someone’s reaction to something: How do you like my new shoes?

like verb (WANT)

[I/T] to want something: [T] I’d like the chicken soup, please. [+ to infinitive] The commissioner would like to say thanks to everyone who’s helped. [T] Would you like (= Do you want) something to drink? Note: Used with "would" to ask for something or express something in a polite way.
liking
noun [U]  /ˈlɑɪ·kɪŋ/ us  
The dessert was a bit sweet for my liking.

like

preposition, conjunction  /lɑɪk/ us  

like preposition, conjunction (SIMILAR TO)

similar to; in the same way or manner as: I’ve got a sweater just like yours. Stop acting like a jerk! She looks just like her father. infmlLike I said (= As I already said), I’m not interested in buying insurance at the moment. If you ask what something is like, you are asking someone to describe it or compare it to something: What’s your new job like? What does it taste like?

like preposition, conjunction (AS IF)

as if it will or was; in a way that suggests: It looks like rain. It sounds to me like you ought to change jobs.

like

noun [U]  /lɑɪk/ us  
someone similar to another person or something similar to another thing: Planners unveiled designs for a multibillion-dollar cultural district whose like has never been seen before.

like

preposition  /lɑɪk/ us  

like preposition (WILLING TO)

willing to; in the mood for: I don’t feel like going out tonight.

like preposition (TYPICAL OF)

typical or characteristic of; to be expected of: It’s not like you to be so quiet – are you all right?

like preposition (SUCH AS)

such as; for example: I prefer natural fabrics like cotton and wool. Alonzo is not the kind of guy who would do something like this.

like

adverb [not gradable]  /lɑɪk/ not standard us  

like adverb [not gradable] (PAUSE)

used in conversation to emphasize what follows, or when you cannot express your exact meaning: He’s, like, really friendly – someone you can talk to. It was, like, getting pretty late but I didn’t want to go home yet. Like is also used in conversation to introduce someone else’s words or your own words: So I’m telling Patti about my class and she’s like, No way, and I’m like, It happened.
(Definition of like from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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