Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “little”

See all translations

little

adjective  /ˈlɪt̬·əl/ us  

little adjective (SMALL)

[-er/-est only] small in size or amount, or brief in time: She has a little room on the top floor where she works on her computer. They have very little money. It’ll take me a little while longer to get ready. [-er/-est only] Little can be used with approving words for emphasis: They have a nice little house.

little adjective (YOUNG)

[-er/-est only] young: When you were little, you and your brother were always fighting. My little brother/sister (= younger brother or sister) is seven years old. He stayed home from work today because his little boy/girl (= young son or daughter) is sick.

little adjective (NOT IMPORTANT)

[not gradable] not important or not serious: I had a little problem with my car, but it’s fixed now.

little

adverb  /ˈlɪt̬·əl/ ( comparative less  /les/, superlative least  /list/) us  

little adverb (NOT MUCH)

not much: The county has done little to improve the traffic problem. It’s a little-known fact that technically ticks are not insects.a little A little means slightly: She was a little frightened. You’re walking a little too fast for me.

little

pronoun, noun [U]  /ˈlɪt̬·əl/ us  

little pronoun, noun [U] (SMALL)

a small amount: I could understand very little of what he said.a little A little means a small amount of something: "Do we have any sugar left?" "A little."
(Definition of little from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of little?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “little” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

white Christmas

a Christmas when it snows

Word of the Day

Cleavage proves divisive in Cambridge’s words of 2014

by Alastair Horne,
December 19, 2014
​​​​ Other dictionaries may choose faddish novelties as their words of the year, but here at Cambridge, we like to do something different. We look for the words that have seen sudden surges in searches over the course of the year – words that have been baffling users of English and driven them

Read More 

cinderella surgery noun

December 15, 2014
cosmetic surgery to the feet We have all heard of people having nose jobs, boob jobs and liposuction – but now a new trend growing in popularity in America: Cinderella surgery.

Read More