little Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "little" - American English Dictionary

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littleadjective

 us   /ˈlɪt̬·əl/

little adjective (SMALL)

[-er/-est only] small in size or amount, or brief in time: She has a little room on the top floor where she works on her computer. They have very little money. It’ll take me a little while longer to get ready. [-er/-est only] Little can be used with approving words for emphasis: They have a nice little house.

little adjective (YOUNG)

[-er/-est only] young: When you were little, you and your brother were always fighting. My little brother/sister (= younger brother or sister) is seven years old. He stayed home from work today because his little boy/girl (= young son or daughter) is sick.

little adjective (NOT IMPORTANT)

[not gradable] not important or not serious: I had a little problem with my car, but it’s fixed now.

littleadverb

 us   /ˈlɪt̬·əl/ (comparative less  /les/ , superlative least  /list/ )

little adverb (NOT MUCH)

not much: The county has done little to improve the traffic problem. It’s a little-known fact that technically ticks are not insects.a little A little means slightly: She was a little frightened. You’re walking a little too fast for me.

littlepronoun, noun [U]

 us   /ˈlɪt̬·əl/

little pronoun, noun [U] (SMALL)

a small amount: I could understand very little of what he said.a little A little means a small amount of something: "Do we have any sugar left?" "A little."
(Definition of little from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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