look Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

Meaning of "look" - American English Dictionary

See all translations

lookverb

 us   /lʊk/

look verb (SEE)

[I] to direct your eyes in order to see: Come look at what I’ve found. She looked at her brother. He looked out (of) the window of the bus.

look verb (SEARCH)

[I always + adv/prep] to try to find something: Please help me look for my keys. We looked everywhere but couldn’t find it. I’ll look for a present for Tracy while I’m at the mall.

look verb (SEEM)

[L] to seem or appear to be: The roads look icy. That dress looks nice on you. He looked friendly. She looked like she hadn’t slept all night. He has started to look his age (= appear as old as he really is). It looks like (= It is likely that) we’ll be finished by January. It looks like snow (= It seems likely to snow).

look verb (EXAMINE)

[I always + adv/prep] to examine or study, often quickly or informally: Would you look over these numbers to see if I’ve made a mistake? I don’t go there to shop – I just like to look around and see what they have.

look verb (FACE)

[I] to be in or view a particular direction; face: The garden looks east. The porch looks out over the lake.

lookexclamation

 us   /lʊk/

look exclamation (GETTING ATTENTION)

used to get someone’s attention, often to express anger or annoyance: Look, I’ve already told you that I’m not lending you any more money.

looknoun

 us   /lʊk/

look noun (SEEM)

[C] an expression of the face, or a particular appearance: a joyful/sad look I didn’t like the look of the place and left as soon as I could. [pl] He had good looks and lots of money.
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of look?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

Definitions of “look” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day
straight

the straight part of a racetrack (= the track on which competitors race)

Word of the Day

Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
Are you a glass-half-full person? (Everyday Idioms)
by Kate Woodford,
July 29, 2015
A reader of this blog recently asked for a post on idioms that are used in everyday English. This seemed like a reasonable request. After all, if you are going to make the effort to learn a set of English idioms, you want those idioms to be useful. The question, then, was

Read More 

exoskeleton noun
exoskeleton noun
July 27, 2015
a robotic device which goes around the legs and part of the body of a person who cannot walk and allows them to move independently and in an upright position The device, known as an exoskeleton, is strapped to the outside of a person’s limbs and can then be controlled by them.

Read More