look Meaning in Cambridge American English Dictionary
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Meaning of "look" - American English Dictionary

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lookverb

 us   /lʊk/

look verb (SEE)

[I] to direct your eyes in order to see: Come look at what I’ve found. She looked at her brother. He looked out (of) the window of the bus.

look verb (SEARCH)

[I always + adv/prep] to try to find something: Please help me look for my keys. We looked everywhere but couldn’t find it. I’ll look for a present for Tracy while I’m at the mall.

look verb (SEEM)

[L] to seem or appear to be: The roads look icy. That dress looks nice on you. He looked friendly. She looked like she hadn’t slept all night. He has started to look his age (= appear as old as he really is). It looks like (= It is likely that) we’ll be finished by January. It looks like snow (= It seems likely to snow).

look verb (EXAMINE)

[I always + adv/prep] to examine or study, often quickly or informally: Would you look over these numbers to see if I’ve made a mistake? I don’t go there to shop – I just like to look around and see what they have.

look verb (FACE)

[I] to be in or view a particular direction; face: The garden looks east. The porch looks out over the lake.

lookexclamation

 us   /lʊk/

look exclamation (GETTING ATTENTION)

used to get someone’s attention, often to express anger or annoyance: Look, I’ve already told you that I’m not lending you any more money.

looknoun

 us   /lʊk/

look noun (SEEM)

[C] an expression of the face, or a particular appearance: a joyful/sad look I didn’t like the look of the place and left as soon as I could. [pl] He had good looks and lots of money.
(Definition of look from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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