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English definition of “lose”

lose

verb  /luz/ (past tense and past participle lost  /lɔst/) us  

lose verb (NOT BE ABLE TO FIND)

[T] to not be able to find something: I lost my keys somewhere in the house. Two officers chased the suspect, but he turned down an alley and they lost sight of him (= could no longer see him).

lose verb (NO LONGER POSSESS)

[T] to no longer have something, because it has been taken away from you, either by accident or purposely: Workers will lose their jobs if the plant closes. He lost his leg in a car accident. [T] If you lose someone, that person dies: George lost his wife in 1990. [T] If you lose money you have risked, you do not make a profit and do not get your money back. [T] A business that is losing money is spending more money than it is receiving.

lose verb (BE DEFEATED)

[I/T] to fail to succeed in a game or competition: [I] If we lose again, we’re out of the playoffs. [T] Anderson lost the election by a narrow margin.

lose verb (NOT MAINTAIN)

[T] to not maintain or no longer have control over a quality or ability: She used to play tennis regularly, but lately she’s lost interest in it. The driver lost control of her car. The dog is losing her eyesight/hearing/sense of smell. Carl lost his balance and fell down the stairs. [T] If you lose time or an opportunity, you waste it. [T] If a clock loses time, it goes more slowly than it should.

lose verb (HAVE LESS OF)

[T] to have less of something, esp. in the body: to lose blood/weight

lose verb (CONFUSE)

[T] to confuse someone: I’m sorry, you’ve lost me – would you go over that again?
(Definition of lose from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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