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English definition of “man”

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man

noun  /mæn/ ( plural men  /men/) us  

man noun (HUMAN MALE)

[C] an adult male human being: a young man the men’s 400-meter race John can solve anything – the man’s a genius. [C] A man is also a male employee without particular rank or title, or a member of the military who has a low rank: The gas company sent a man to fix the heating system. [C] infml Man is sometimes used when addressing an adult male human being: Hey, man, got a light? [C] infml Man is sometimes used as an exclamation, esp. when the speaker is expressing a strong emotion: Man, what a storm!man and wife When an official at a wedding says a man and a woman have become man and wife, it means they are now married to each other.

man noun (PERSON)

[C/U] the human race, or any member or group of it: [U] prehistoric man [U] This poison is one of the most dangerous substances known to man. [C] All men are equal in the sight of the law. Note: Some people dislike this use of man because it does not seem to give women equal importance with men. They prefer to use other words, such as humanity, humankind, people, and person.

man noun (PIECE)

[C] any of the pieces that are played with in games such as chess
manliness
noun [U]  /ˈmæn·li·nəs/ us  
We no longer equate aggression with manliness.

man

verb [T]  /mæn/ (-nn-) us  

man verb [T] (OPERATE)

to be present in order to operate something, such as equipment or a service: Man the pumps! The phones are manned 24 hours a day. Note: Some people dislike this use of man because it does not seem to give women equal importance with men. They prefer to use other words, such as operate and staff.
(Definition of man from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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