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English definition of “oil”

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oil

noun  /ɔɪl/ us  

oil noun (FAT)

[C/U] thick, liquid fat obtained from plants which does not mix with water and is used esp. in cooking: [U] vegetable/corn/olive oil [U] I like oil and vinegar on my salad. [C] These cookies are made with soybean and palm oils.

oil noun (FUEL)

[U] a thick, liquid substance that burns and is used as fuel or as a lubricant (= substance that helps connecting parts move easily), or the thick liquid taken from under the ground which oil, gasoline , and other products are made from: motor oil fuel/heating oil Change your car’s oil every 12,000 miles.

oil noun (LIQUID SUBSTANCE)

[C] any of a number of thick liquid substances that do not dissolve in water and are used in beauty products, paints, medicines, etc.

oil

verb [T]  /ɔɪl/ us  

oil verb [T] (FUEL)

to add oil to something so it works better: Oil the door hinges so they stop squeaking.

oil verb [T] (FAT)

to put oil on a pan or other surface that you cook on to keep things from sticking to it: Lightly oil the grill.
Translations of “oil”
in Korean 식용유, 기름…
in Arabic زَيْت, بِتْرول…
in French huile…
in Turkish petrol, yemeklik yağ, sıvı yağ…
in Italian olio, petrolio…
in Chinese (Traditional) 燃油, 潤滑油, 石油…
in Russian нефть, масло…
in Polish ropa (naftowa), olej…
in Spanish aceite, petróleo…
in Portuguese óleo, petróleo…
in German das Öl…
in Catalan oli, petroli…
in Japanese 油, 石油…
in Chinese (Simplified) 燃油, 润滑油, 石油…
(Definition of oil from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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