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English definition of “out”

out

preposition, adverb [not gradable]  /ɑʊt/ us  

out preposition, adverb [not gradable] (FROM INSIDE)

from within to a place or position that is not inside a building or not enclosed or contained: I’m going out for a walk. He leaned out the window and waved. Our office looks out on a public park.

out preposition, adverb [not gradable] (AWAY)

away or absent from your home or place of work: I’ll be out tomorrow. Leo went out to lunch . We often eat out (= at restaurants). Bill asked me out (= to go somewhere enjoyable together). If something is out, it is not where it is usually kept or belongs: I checked at the library and that book is out.

out preposition, adverb [not gradable] (FROM A PLACE)

away from a place or starting point, or far away: They moved out to the country. Have you sent out the invitations yet?

out

adverb [not gradable]  /ɑʊt/ us  

out adverb [not gradable] (BEYOND)

in the area beyond a building or room, or outdoors (= not in a building): It’s cold out today. They camped out. Keep out (= Do not enter).

out adverb [not gradable] (REMOVED)

to the point where something is removed or disappears: The stain on my tie won’t come out. Cross out the second number.

out adverb [not gradable] (COMPLETELY)

completely, or as much as possible: She stretched out on the bed. We were tired out.

out adverb [not gradable] (ALOUD)

aloud, so other people can hear: Her mother called out to us.

out

adjective, adverb [not gradable]  /ɑʊt/ us  

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (AVAILABLE)

(esp. of a book, movie, or recording) available to the public: Is his new novel out yet?

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (MADE KNOWN)

made known to the public: The secret’s out about her retirement.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (SEEN)

able to be seen: It stopped raining and the sun came out.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT OPERATING)

no longer operating or working: The electricity went out during the storm. If something that burns is out, it is no longer burning: Be sure the fire is out.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT AWARE)

unconscious, sleeping, or not aware: He passed out (= became unconscious). Matt was so tired, he’s out cold (= in a deep sleep).

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (COMPLETELY USED)

(coming) into a condition in which something has been used and no more of it is left: Our money ran out. His luck was running out. Renew your membership before the month is out.

out adjective, adverb [not gradable] (NOT FASHIONABLE)

infml not fashionable or popular: Long hair is out.

out

adjective [not gradable]  /ɑʊt/ us  

out adjective [not gradable] (NOT ACCEPTABLE)

not acceptable, not possible, or not allowed: Thursday is out so let’s meet Friday.

out adjective [not gradable] (INTENDING)

infml intending to do or get something: He’s just out for a good time. The mayor is out to get some publicity.

out adjective [not gradable] (BASEBALL)

failing or having failed to reach a base: He was out on a close play at second base.

out

noun  /ɑʊt/ us  

out noun (EXCUSE)

[C usually sing] infml an excuse or reason for avoiding an unpleasant situation: The kids need to get home, so we have an out if we need it.
(Definition of out from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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