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English definition of “plant”

plant

noun  /plænt/ us  

plant noun (LIVING THING)

[C] a living thing that usually produces seeds and typically has a stem, leaves, roots, and sometimes flowers: We brought a house plant as a gift when we spent the weekend with our friend Sylvia.

plant noun (GROUP)

biology [U] one of five kingdoms (= groups) into which living things are divided, the members of which have many cells, are unable to control their own movement, and get their energy from the light of the sun

plant noun (FACTORY)

   /plænt/ [C] a factory and the machinery in it used to produce or process something: a manufacturing plant

plant

verb  /plænt/ us  

plant verb (PUT)

[T always + adv/prep] to put something firmly in a particular place: He planted a kiss on her forehead. [T always + adv/prep] To plant an idea or story is to cause it to exist: Defense lawyers try to plant doubts in the minds of the jurors about what actually happened.

plant verb (PUT SECRETLY)

[T] to put something or someone in a position secretly, esp. in order to deceive: She insisted that the real thief had planted the evidence in her car.

plant verb (LIVING THING)

[T] to put a seed or plant into the ground or into a container of earth so that it will grow: We’ve planted some trees along the back of our property.
(Definition of plant from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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