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English definition of “pocket”

pocket

noun [C]  /ˈpɑk·ɪt/ us  

pocket noun [C] (BAG)

a small bag, usually made of cloth, sewn on the inside or outside of a piece of clothing and used to hold small objects: coat/pants/shirt pockets She took her keys out of her pocket. I paid for my ticket out of my own pocket (= with my own money). A pocket is also a small container that is part of or attached to something else: The map is in the pocket on the car door. In the game of pool, the pockets are the holes around the edge of the table into which the balls are hit.

pocket noun [C] (PART)

a small part of something larger that is considered separate because of a particular quality: It remained a pocket of poverty within a generally affluent area.
pocketful
noun [C]  /ˈpɑk·ɪtˌfʊl/ us  
a pocketful of coins

pocket

adjective [not gradable]  /ˈpɑk·ɪt/ us  

pocket adjective [not gradable] (BAG)

small enough to be kept in a pocket: a pocket diary a pocket watch

pocket

verb [T]  /ˈpɑk·ɪt/ us  

pocket verb [T] (BAG)

to put something in your pocket, or (fig.) to take money esp. when it has been obtained unfairly or illegally: He pocketed his change. fig. Some sold nonexistent land and pocketed all the cash.
(Definition of pocket from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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