Cambridge Dictionaries online Cambridge Dictionaries online

The most popular online dictionary and thesaurus for learners of English

English definition of “print”

print

verb [T]  /prɪnt/ us  

print verb [T] (MAKE TEXT)

to put letters or images on paper or another material using a machine, or to produce books, magazines, newspapers, etc., in this way: The newspaper printed my letter to the editor. To print is also to write without joining the letters together: Please print your name clearly below your signature. To print something out is to print text or images from a machine attached to a computer: [M] Just print out the first two pages.

print

noun  /prɪnt/ us  

print noun (PICTURE)

[C] a single photograph made from film, or a photograph of a painting or other work of art: We made extra prints of the baby to send out with the birth announcement. [C] A print is also a picture made by pressing paper or other material against a special surface covered with ink: woodcut prints

print noun (PATTERN)

[C] a pattern produced on a piece of cloth, or cloth having such a pattern: a print dress

print noun (MARK)

[C] a mark left on a surface where something has been pressed on it: The dog left prints all over the kitchen floor. [C] A print is also a fingerprint.

print noun (TEXT)

[U] text or images that are produced on paper or other material by printing in print If something is in print, it is published and available to buy: Is the book still in print? out of print If a book is out of print, it is no longer available from a publisher: I’m afraid you can’t get that book – it’s out of print.
(Definition of print from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
What is the pronunciation of print?
Add Cambridge dictionaries to your browser to your website

More American English definitions for “print”

Definitions of “print” in other dictionaries

Word of the Day

yo

used as an informal greeting between people who know each other or as an expression of approval

Word of the Day

Come on – you can do it! Phrasal verbs with ‘come’.

by Liz Walter​,
November 19, 2014
As part of an occasional series on the tricky subject of phrasal verbs, this blog looks at ones formed with the verb ‘come’. If you are reading this blog, I’m sure you already know come from, as it is one of the first things you learn in class: I come from Scotland/Spain.

Read More 

silver splicer noun

November 17, 2014
informal a person who marries in later life Newly retired and now newlywed – rise of the ‘silver splicers’ Reaching pension age becomes a trigger to tie the knot as baby-boomers begin to redefine retirement

Read More