print - definition in the American English Dictionary - Cambridge Dictionaries Online

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English definition of “print”

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print

verb [T]  us   /prɪnt/

print verb [T] (MAKE TEXT)

to put letters or images on paper or another material using a machine, or to produce books, magazines, newspapers, etc., in this way: The newspaper printed my letter to the editor. To print is also to write without joining the letters together: Please print your name clearly below your signature. To print something out is to print text or images from a machine attached to a computer: [M] Just print out the first two pages.

print

noun  us   /prɪnt/

print noun (PICTURE)

[C] a single photograph made from film, or a photograph of a painting or other work of art: We made extra prints of the baby to send out with the birth announcement. [C] A print is also a picture made by pressing paper or other material against a special surface covered with ink: woodcut prints

print noun (PATTERN)

[C] a pattern produced on a piece of cloth, or cloth having such a pattern: a print dress

print noun (MARK)

[C] a mark left on a surface where something has been pressed on it: The dog left prints all over the kitchen floor. [C] A print is also a fingerprint .

print noun (TEXT)

[U] text or images that are produced on paper or other material by printingin print If something is in print, it is published and available to buy: Is the book still in print?out of print If a book is out of print, it is no longer available from a publisher: I’m afraid you can’t get that book – it’s out of print.
(Definition of print from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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