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English definition of “pull”

pull

verb  /pʊl/ us  

pull verb (MOVE TOWARD YOU)

[I/T] to move something toward yourself, sometimes with great physical effort: [I] Could you help me move this bookcase over there? You pull and I’ll push. [T] Alice lay down and pulled a blanket over her. [I] The little girl pulled at his sleeve (= moved it slightly and repeatedly toward her).

pull verb (REMOVE)

[T] to take something out of or away from a place, esp. using physical effort: [M] The dentist had to pull two of my teeth out. [M] I spent the morning pulling up weeds in the garden. She’s asking companies to pull their ads from the program. pulls a weapon on Someone who pulls a weapon on you takes it from a hidden place and points it at you.

pull verb (BRING BEHIND YOU)

[I/T] to hold or be attached to the front of something and cause it to move with you: [T] The car was pulling a trailer. [I] Elise sat on the sled while Carol pulled.

pull verb (MOVE IN A DIRECTION)

[I always + adv/prep] to move or move something in the stated direction: Her car pulled out into traffic. The sun was so strong we had to pull down the blinds. He pulled off his wet clothes and laid them out to dry. pull up a chair If you pull up a chair, you move a chair so you can sit with other people: Pull up a chair and join us.

pull verb (MOVE YOUR BODY)

[I/T] to move your body or a part of your body: [I] He started yelling at the referee and had to be pulled away by teammates. [T always + adv/prep] He pulled his arm out just as the doors were closing. [T always + adv/prep] She pulled herself up onto the rock.

pull verb (OPERATE A DEVICE)

[T] to operate a device that makes a piece of equipment work: She took out a quarter, dropped it into the slot machine, and pulled the lever.

pull verb (ATTRACT)

[T] to attract a person or people: She was able to pull more votes than the other candidates. [M] The networks are grabbing for any edge that pulls in viewers.

pull verb (INJURE)

[T] to injure a muscle by stretching it too much: Marie pulled a hamstring and couldn’t play in the finals.

pull verb (BE DISHONEST)

[T] slang to perform an action that is dishonest or intended to deceive: Mikey was pulling his usual stunt of feeding most of his lunch to the cat. Why would you try to pull a trick/prank like that on her?

pull

noun  /pʊl/ us  

pull noun (INFLUENCE)

[U] infml influence, esp. with important people: The manufacturer used political pull to get the application approved.
(Definition of pull from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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