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English definition of “put”

put

verb  /pʊt/ (present participle putting, past tense and past participle put) us  

put verb (MOVE)

[T always + adv/prep] to move something or someone into the stated place, position, or direction: She put her arm around him. Put your clothes in the closet. When you set the table, put the soup spoons next to the knives. She put her coffee cup on the table. The movie was so scary that she put her hands over her eyes. put someone to bed If you put someone to bed, you dress the person in the clothes worn for sleeping and see that the person gets into bed: I’ll call back after I put the kids to bed.

put verb (WRITE)

[T always + adv/prep] to write down or record: Put your name on the list if you want to go. Put an answer in the space provided.

put verb (EXPRESS)

[T] to express something in words: She wanted to tell him that she didn’t want to see him any more, but she didn’t know how to put it. He has difficulty putting his feelings into words. [T] If you put something in a particular way, you express it that way: To put it bluntly, Pete, you’re just no good at the job. Dad was annoyed, to put it mildly.

put verb (CONDITION)

[T] to cause something to be in the stated condition or situation: Are you prepared to put your children at risk? This puts me in a very difficult position. What put you in such a bad mood?

put verb (JUDGE)

[T always + adv/prep] to judge something or someone in comparison with other similar things or people: I’d put him among the top six tennis players of all time. The value of the painting has been put at $1.5 million. He always puts his family first.
(Definition of put from the Cambridge Academic Content Dictionary © Cambridge University Press)
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